EQ: Do violent video games cause violent behavior in today’s youth? (Matt M)

EQ: Do violent video games cause violent behavior in today’s youth?
BACKGROUND: Because of the recent upsurge in popularity that video games have undergone, people are beginning to question their effects on the people who play them. The biggest focus of these studies is to judge the effects that violent video games have on today’s youth. Many studies have been conducted, but so far there has not been any direct link found between violent acts in youth and violent video games. In fact, many of the kids who perform these violent acts have not really had interest in video games. A connection could be drawn here, but it is unlikely the two had any resounding influence. The research still goes on to find the truth in the matter, and some may argue it has already been found.
CLAIM: Violent video games should definitely be regulated so that younger kids aren’t exposed to them to early, but it would be very extreme to say that video games have directly caused violence in those who play them.
SUPPORT: “Playing violent video games reduces violence in adolescent boys by serving as a substitute for rough and tumble play. Playing violent video games allows adolescent boys to express aggression and establish status in the peer group without causing physical harm.” This is a quote from the journal of adolescent research by the research team at Massachusetts General Hospital. Most kids today have had some interaction with video games in their lives. There are even some who spend hours and hours playing them. It is easy to see that some people would begin connecting violent acts in today’s youth with the rising popularity of video games. The biggest hole in this logic, however, is that violence in today’s youth has actually dropped in the past few years. It can also be argued that violence in video games helps to satisfy competitive desires in a safe manner. When interviewed by the team at Massachusetts General Hospital, many of the kids that play violent video games say that they do it to relieve stress and frustration.

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4 Comments

Filed under Controversial Issue #1

4 responses to “EQ: Do violent video games cause violent behavior in today’s youth? (Matt M)

  1. Kenneth Nevarez-Hernandez

    I agree with your idea that video games should be regulated for younger kids, because a younger kid might not be able to differentiate the game world and the real world because the brain is in an earlier stage of development. “Video game players understand they are playing a game. Their ability to distinguish between fantasy and reality prevents them from emulating video game violence in real life.”(Steven Malliet, “An Exploration of Adolescents’ Perceptions of Videogame Realism,” Learning Media and Technology, 2006)

  2. Alyssa Garrido

    I agree with your claim of regulating the age restrictions for certain video games. While violent video games may not be connected with violent behavior, what about other behavioral acts such as cursing or rude gestures? Young children who are exposed to vulgar television shows, music, games, etc. tend to have attitude issues and more disrespectful.

    • Matt M.

      I am in no way trying to justify children watching explicit material in either movies or TV shows. In my blog intro i argue that violent video games should be better regulated in order to prevent young children from being exposed to them too early on.

  3. You make some powerful claims, here, Matt! But your evidence (sources) beg the question about authority and credibility. This can be avoided by direct quotation and source citations.

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